The University of Oregon have announced Monday that, following the completion of their triple crown (cross country, indoor track, outdoor track) this past weekend, the university has placed a $50k stud fee on every single member of the school’s female track team. 

In an effort to help boost the university’s income on top of a recent $4.5 million budget cut, Oregon have elected to turn their entire female track team into studs for the university. The university will seek a $50k stud fee from anyone who wishes to use their female track athletes for studding purposes. 

“This new endeavor by the University once again shows our dedication to our indentured serv-I mean student athletes,” stated Oregon athletic director Rob Mullens. “The accomplishments by our female track athletes are something we are very proud of at the university. We would like to share those accomplishments with the greater track community by helping craft and shape the future generations of elite track athletes.”

Following this announcement, many individuals have voiced their fervent frustrations toward the university for treating their student athletes like horses. However, Mullens has assured that the female track athletes involved will be given the utmost care and consideration. 

“While we understand why some may be critical of us for turning our propert-I mean student athletes into studs, there is nothing in the NCAA rulebook that states we aren’t allow to do this,” said Mullens. “If the NCAA rulebook doesn’t have a rule against it then that must mean it’s wholesome and beneficial to the student athlete. We promise that the utmost care will be put into our female track and field athletes during this process.”

Mullens later announced that the university plans on constructing a new mixed use building on the University of Oregon campus to house the female track athletes. The new building will be called the Jaqua Stud Farm for Student Athletes and located directly north of Matthew Knight Arena. 

Mullens also stated that, if the studding of their female track athletes goes over well, the university plans to expand the program to incorporate athletes from other sports. “We’re constantly at the forefront of innovation in college athletics and we believe this might be the next step in that evolution.”